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CONSERVATION. WILDLIFE CORRIDORS

Seventy years have passed since the earliest efforts were made to conserve this vast, diverse region be­tween Mexico and the United States. In 1935, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to acquire land for a national park in the region, and the state of Texas deeded the Texas Canyons State Park to the federal government. In 1944, Big Bend National Park became a reality under the management of the National Park Service. The dream of creating an international conservation network has persisted since those early years: a network that will protect the extraordinary biological and scenic riches of both countries.

In 1948, the state of Texas began the land acquisition for Black Gap Wildlife Management Area; in 1988, it acquired the land for Big Bend Ranch State Park. These sites are located along the border on either side of Big Bend National Park and are managed by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD). In Mexico, the response was slower in coming; as late as the 1990s, two enormous reserves were designated Flora and Fauna Protection Areas: Maderas del Carmen in Coahuila, and Cañón de Santa Elena in Chihuahua, both of which lie along the banks of the Rio Grande which, in turn, runs parallel to the natural protected areas in the United States.

At the same time, the U.S. Congress gave a 196-mile stretch of the Rio Grande the denomination of Wild and Scenic River.         

Agrupación Sierra Madre, Unidos para la Conservación and corporations whose commitment has helped, principally in Mexico, to bring about the rebirth of the original idea of making the dream of protecting this bi-national region a fortunate reality.

There is no doubt that the current climate is very encouraging, although it lacks a regional vision and a joint plan of action for the different actors who share the same interest in and concern about the future of the region’s wilderness.

Additionally, it should be recognized that the region’s long, eventful history has left a certain amount of ill feeling on either side of the border: wars, loss of territory, drug trafficking, illegal migration and increased border security in the wake of the recent terrorist attacks all constitute ticklish challenges to be faced. For this reason, the recent advances on conservation issues represent a wonderful opportunity not only to deal with the ever-present threat of land fragmentation, but also to unite the different actors and models to be followed and provide them a with common vision.

The cards are once again on the table. This is the right moment to set up alliances and channels of cooperation that define the path to follow. Conservation must not be limited by a country’s political borders since ecosystems extend far beyond. This document, therefore, seeks to bring the different actors in both countries together in one single group capable of setting up negotiations with the united aim of implementing the initiatives required to guarantee the future of biodiversity conservation in this mega-biological corridor.
 

         El Carmen - English Booklet
         Download (format: .PDF)

           El Carmen - Folleto Español
         Download (format: .PDF)

 
National Geographic
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(language: English, format: .PDF)
Especies
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(language: Spanish, format: .PDF)
México Desconocido
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(language: Spanish, format: .PDF)
Natur's Best Photography
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(language: English, format: .PDF)


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